The Ghost and the Guest: An Unexpected and Unlikely Album

Jake Workman The Ghost and the Guest is an interesting album that was recorded in a simple bedroom studio and was released last year by LDS artist Jake Workman. Loyal Linescratchers followers may recognize Jake from his days with the group “The Sweater Friends”. Prior to listening to this album, I had never heard any of his music, and knew little about him. So, it was with a completely fresh and unbiased perspective that I was able to sit down and listen to his music.

I reviewed the album in a digital download form and found that the download contained much more than just music. Graphics from the album are included, as is a scanned copy of a handwritten thank you note from Jake. Most interesting though was a large booklet, which was conveniently provided in a number of different e-reader formats. Right about here is where things started to get weird, interesting, or sentimental – depending on how you look at it. The included e-book comes in at over 40 pages. In the preface, we learn that the songs were inspired by the life of Henry Pickett Pratt, who was born in 1866, and left a journal about some of his early life – a journal which was read by Jake Workman. Something about this man and his experiences struck a chord (pun intended) with Jake, and provided the inspiration for the songs on the album. The e-book includes portions of the journal that provide a backdrop of sorts for the songs. Jake has intended for the journal and the music to be enjoyed simultaneously in order to get the full experience of what he intended to create and capture.

Continue reading “The Ghost and the Guest: An Unexpected and Unlikely Album”

The Ghost and the Guest: An Unexpected and Unlikely Album

Linescratching Post for the week of March 28, 2011

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Vol 1 No. 5, Week of March 28, 2011

In this issue: Some linescratchers break up! The Pearl and the Beard make the rest of us feel like worthless lumps! Gladys Knight takes on Vegas and Amtrak! The Aquabats! make the rest of us feel like real go-getters! Low does some stuff! I include a bowdlerized Jawbreaker reference! and more!

Continue reading “Linescratching Post for the week of March 28, 2011”

Linescratching Post for the week of March 28, 2011

Linescratching Post for the week of March 14, 2011

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Vol 1 No. 4, Week of March 14, 2011

In this issue: A Mormon hits #1 on Billboard; various linescratchers play a ridiculous amount of shows in Austin; Brandon Flowers plays Eden; The Sweater Friends promote Autism; The JaneDear girls give us some contraries to wrestle with, and we don’t talk about Jimmer Fredette leading BYU to the #3 NCAA seed, Brandon Davies and the honor code, how many babies John Stewart  wants to have with The Book Of Mormon musical, or anything related to the 5 Browns because we’re too busy discussing whether Charlie Sheen is a Mormon, an ex-Mormon, and old school Mormon, a freelance Polygamist, or just a run-of-the-mill tigerblood. Continue reading “Linescratching Post for the week of March 14, 2011”

Linescratching Post for the week of March 14, 2011

La Deshumanización del Arte

First off, let me apologize for the lack of posts, my 18 credit hours this semester have been keeping me busy.

From that school work however, I came across an interesting essay by a man named José Ortega y Gasset called La Deshumanización del Arte. Written in 1925, the essay explores art, what it was before his time and what it had become.  For Ortega, art is something lost to some and loved by others.  He wrote (translated):

“Wherefore, the new art divides the public in two classes of individuals: those who understand it and those who don’t understand it; those being, the artists and those who are not artists.  The new art is an artistic art.” (p 53)

Artistic art?  Isn’t that a little redundant?  Like a flavorful flavor or colorful color?   Continue reading “La Deshumanización del Arte”

La Deshumanización del Arte

The Space

As a musician that has played at all in the last 10 or so years, I have had to create an interesting Myspace page. (http://www.myspace.com/thesweaterfriends).  Well, at least I have felt the need to.  Myspace has been the go to site for years when you like a band.  Aside from creepsters, artists seem to use the site more than anyone else.  Though my html knowledge is  quite limited (as you can probably see, ha), I still go thru our source code every now and then and try to spruce it up, or at least speed up the loading time.

My question to you all, as music lovers and creators, is if Myspace is still the go to music site when you are interested in a new band? Continue reading “The Space”

The Space

Podcast – July 5th, 2010

Interview with multi-talented composer, singer, performer, pianist, American Idol finalist, philanthropist, and Live for Music creator, Shaun “Hammer Hands” Barrowes! Shaun talks about his dance competition, his passion for music in schools, songwriting, his faith, and his sweet ride.

For more information about Shaun’s high school band tour, and his international dance competition with So You Think You Can Dance choreographer Mandy Moore, check out the websites at www.liveformusictour.com and www.liveformusicdance.com. The dance competition will be accepting submissions until August 1st, 2010.

If This Is To Be Goodbye – Jeff Zentner
Empty Beds – Good Morning Passenger
Live or Die – Shaun “Hammer Hands” Barrowes
Interview with Shaun “Hammer Hands” Barrowes
You Came Along – Shaun “Hammer Hands” Barrowes
This Time – The Sweater Friends

Podcast – July 5th, 2010

An Introduction: Poetic Function and Music

Hello!

My name is Jake and this my first official post as a member of the Linescratchers team and I could not be more thrilled about it.  To start off I would like to pose a simple question: what is poetry? Is it flowery words?  Or fourteen lines about love with a specific rhyme scheme?  Maybe even deep thought smashed into a simple text?

Well, if you ask Roman Jakobson, a Russian linguist born in 1896, it is none of these.  Poetry, or the poetic function, is simply communicating in a form different then the standard norm or language.  For example, if we spoke in rhyme all the time then rhyming sentences would become the norm or standard.  Any deviation from this norm, or not rhyming, would be using the poetic function.  Poetry is noticed and memorable because it stands out among the background of everyday speaking.  I bring this up to point out that poetry is made simply by being different, pushing your way outside the box in order to be seen, and if applied to music, to be heard. Continue reading “An Introduction: Poetic Function and Music”

An Introduction: Poetic Function and Music