Why LDS musicians? Or, Learning to Live with Dissonance

I have been asked on numerous occasions why Linescratchers features LDS musicians. One of the earliest forms of this question came from extremely early on in Linescratchers history – before I even published my first post. I had sent out a bajillion emails to various and sundry musicians to try and find active Mormons who were musicians. One of the random folks I sent an email to wrote back and said something along the lines of (I don’t have the email anymore): “I have some friends you should interview! They’re not Mormon though. But they totally deserve a little publicity!”

And I responded to them by saying, “Well, that’s awesome and everything, but really the point of this website is to feature Mormons only.

And they responded by saying, in effect, “That’s pretty unfair and judgmental that you would only feature Mormons, there are lots of good musicians out there who need publicity who aren’t Mormons. You shouldn’t judge them just because they’re not Mormons.”

And I responded by saying, in effect, “…”

It seemed obvious in my head that I would be accomplishing something very specific and important by only featuring LDS musicians. I was completely caught off-guard by the idea that this was judgmental and unfair, and I didn’t have much of a response to that. Now over the years, I think I’ve refined my message a bit, but in a lot of ways the response I got that day has stuck with me. I have asked myself more than once, “Why LDS musicians? What’s the point?” Continue reading “Why LDS musicians? Or, Learning to Live with Dissonance”

Why LDS musicians? Or, Learning to Live with Dissonance

LDS Musicians Facebook fan page

We at Linescratchers noticed that there isn’t an “LDS Musicians” Facebook fan page worth mentioning.  There IS an old “LDS Musicians” Facebook in the old group format but it’s about to get archived (and featured some questionable spam due to disuse), so we took the initiative to create one, just as Facebook is about to become obsolete… *cough*

If you are an LDS musician or would like to date an LDS musician, this is the perfect fan page for you.

http://www.facebook.com/pages/LDS-Musicians/187461927985311

I am open to the idea of inviting members of the Community of Christ and our other cousin-branches as well, for a bit of diversity.  Tell your friends.

LDS Musicians Facebook fan page

News flash: Musicians are poor.

from theroot.com

If you’re a musician, then it probably didn’t take a journalistic investigation to come to the conclusion that musicians are poor.  Not only are most musicians poor, but the ones who aren’t poor are actually poorer than you think they are.  That’s the gist of this article I just read at The Root, but like most LDS musicians, this is information that I definitely already knew.

Attaching yourself or your band to the corporate structure of a record label has historically had its advantages:  promotions, studios, tour management, image, marketing, etc., but all those things come at a price.  When it all boils down to it, the average musician in the band makes about $23.40 for every $1000 of music sold.  Of course, money isn’t the only problem with this sort of arrangement.  Record labels are notoriously wary of music that ventures out of the box at all, or goes against an already money-making formula.  Many artists who are signed to labels soon disconnect from the lives that inspired their music, often resulting in the dreaded Sophomore Syndrome. Continue reading “News flash: Musicians are poor.”

News flash: Musicians are poor.