The Ghost and the Guest: An Unexpected and Unlikely Album

Jake Workman The Ghost and the Guest is an interesting album that was recorded in a simple bedroom studio and was released last year by LDS artist Jake Workman. Loyal Linescratchers followers may recognize Jake from his days with the group “The Sweater Friends”. Prior to listening to this album, I had never heard any of his music, and knew little about him. So, it was with a completely fresh and unbiased perspective that I was able to sit down and listen to his music.

I reviewed the album in a digital download form and found that the download contained much more than just music. Graphics from the album are included, as is a scanned copy of a handwritten thank you note from Jake. Most interesting though was a large booklet, which was conveniently provided in a number of different e-reader formats. Right about here is where things started to get weird, interesting, or sentimental – depending on how you look at it. The included e-book comes in at over 40 pages. In the preface, we learn that the songs were inspired by the life of Henry Pickett Pratt, who was born in 1866, and left a journal about some of his early life – a journal which was read by Jake Workman. Something about this man and his experiences struck a chord (pun intended) with Jake, and provided the inspiration for the songs on the album. The e-book includes portions of the journal that provide a backdrop of sorts for the songs. Jake has intended for the journal and the music to be enjoyed simultaneously in order to get the full experience of what he intended to create and capture.

Continue reading “The Ghost and the Guest: An Unexpected and Unlikely Album”

The Ghost and the Guest: An Unexpected and Unlikely Album

Social Media

Fail Whale

I have been amazed the past year or so with how social media has affected the Middle East.  I remember how I had used my Twitter account maybe twice until the Iranian elections took place and the people their protested.  I stayed up late for three or four nights in a row reading the tweets of the protesters.  It was incredibly powerful being able to read the news direct from the source, from the people on the ground taking pictures and uploading camera phone videos.  You could turn on the nightly news during the protests and Brian Williams would be reporting what people had tweeted that day, seeming almost behind the times because I had read the reports as they came in.  From this moment on, I became a believer in Twitter and the power that comes from instantly communicating thoughts to the entire world. Continue reading “Social Media”

Social Media

Selling Yourself

So the title might sound a little more anti-conformist than this post deserves but it describes an issue any musician is faced with when they begin to sell their own music.  Music has always been in large part tied to the image that a given song creates.  Phat beats and a stadium synth can place the listener in the hippest night club ever.  A twangy melody and a lap guitar will send you to the broken pickup out back.  And yes, even three power chords with enough fuzz will have you raging against any machine.  But when it comes down to it, the image of a musician has a lot to do with they those sounds produce their corresponding reactions.

Staying true to the foundation of this website, Mormon musicians are not exempt from the identity crisis that is the music scene.  And while some musicians choose not to place their faith in the limelight, being of a “peculiar” people makes this easier said than done.  This brings up an interesting question, is it ethical to use your religious beliefs or background to sell music?  While making money from one’s faith is the basis of this question, we will focus on the music point of view for this post. Continue reading “Selling Yourself”

Selling Yourself

Bearcats – This Wildfire Magic review

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Band: Bearcats

Album: This Wildfire Magic

Recommended if you like: Spoon, Phoenix, Tokyo Police Club, Futureheads

Websitehttp://www.facebook.com/wearebearcats

I first heard Bearcats on Facebook some time ago while dorking around between classes and was instantly amused with what I found. Since the release of their recent album, my initial response panned out to be much more than my usual affection towards local band. Bringing a chilled out Pixies-esk tone to the table with a big dose of British indie drive and hook, Bearcats show some real maturity for their first venture as a band. Formerly called Alt Alt, the group itself currently calls Provo home, but hails from Brigham City in Northern Utah. The three-piece stems from high school friendships (which by my judgment wasn’t that long ago) and have since found great cohesion musically. Continue reading “Bearcats – This Wildfire Magic review”

Bearcats – This Wildfire Magic review

Good Morning Milo – Through the Chaos and Clatter review

GMMAlbum: Through the Chaos and Clatter

Artist: Good Morning Milo

Home Town: San Diego, CA

Recommended if you like: Fall Out Boy, Panic at the Disco, Second Hand Serenade, or Paramore.

Imagine Fall Out Boy and Panic at the Disco having a baby that could play the guitar better and you’ll have Good Morning Milo.  Their full-length album Through the Chaos and Clatter is a great mixture of poppy over-the-top vocals placed on the melodic layers that constitute the rest of the group. Continue reading “Good Morning Milo – Through the Chaos and Clatter review”

Good Morning Milo – Through the Chaos and Clatter review

La Deshumanización del Arte

First off, let me apologize for the lack of posts, my 18 credit hours this semester have been keeping me busy.

From that school work however, I came across an interesting essay by a man named José Ortega y Gasset called La Deshumanización del Arte. Written in 1925, the essay explores art, what it was before his time and what it had become.  For Ortega, art is something lost to some and loved by others.  He wrote (translated):

“Wherefore, the new art divides the public in two classes of individuals: those who understand it and those who don’t understand it; those being, the artists and those who are not artists.  The new art is an artistic art.” (p 53)

Artistic art?  Isn’t that a little redundant?  Like a flavorful flavor or colorful color?   Continue reading “La Deshumanización del Arte”

La Deshumanización del Arte

Image of the Invisible

I went to a concert the other night and had an interesting moment.  Before I tell you the band though, I want to share a few of the words from one of their songs.  Maybe you’ll know it, maybe not.  It goes:

We’re more than carbon and chemicals
We are the image of the invisible
Free will is ours and we can’t let go
We are the image of the invisible

We all were lost now we are found
No one can stop us or slow us down
We all are named and we are known
We know that we’ll never walk alone

Though all the world may hate us, we are named
Though shadow over take us, we are known

Raise up the banner, bend back your bows
Remove the cancer, take back your souls Continue reading “Image of the Invisible”

Image of the Invisible