Interview – Arthur Hatton, founder of Linescratchers

Arthur Hatton is a singer-songwriter based in the southern US (first Kentucky and now Georgia). He has just self-recorded and self-released Odes, his first full-length album.

Arthur is also the founder and honcho here at Linescratchers. He sat down to talk with us about the desperation that bore his new album, why anyone should care that he’s Mormon, and how Eastern Orthodox Christianity has influenced his work.

 

Odes has a unique creation story. Can you describe the contributions from all the people involved and how it came together?

Well, there are a couple creation stories for Odes.  The first is that the project was initially created to help me repair my car.  Long story short, my wife and I were driving down to Charlotte, NC, with our very small baby, for a grad school interview, when our car broke down in the middle of Tennessee.  We were then completely taken advantage of by an unscrupulous tow/mechanic guy and depleted our savings completely.  We didn’t know how we were going to pay bills that month.  So I decided that maybe I should just get a bunch of my recorded demos into some kind of presentable form on a Bandcamp account and sell them to raise money for our bills.  I had been particularly inspired by a collection of ancient Christian hymns called the Odes of Solomon and a few of my songs were strongly influenced by those hymns.  However, due to my pathetic need to pay the bills, a bunch of family and friends pre-ordered the album, enough that our immediate need was fulfilled.  Since the matter wasn’t urgent anymore, I decided to create an album out of the material that was truly worthy of being called an album.  Around 10 months later, Odes was finished.

A few of my musical contacts I’ve made through Linescratchers helped along the way.  Ian Fowles (from The Aquabats!) volunteered to play lead guitar on some songs, and he can be heard in “Don’t Wake Me Now” and “Last Song.”  Davey Morrison Dillard asked me to write a song to be featured in his upcoming film adaptation of the play WWJD? and that was “Don’t Wake Me Now.”  Adam Kaiser of the Neighbors almost played drums but moved out of his city last-minute and couldn’t do it.  I got a friend of a friend, Jared Palick, who plays drums in Portland, to play drums on “Last Song.”  My sister sang harmonies on “Gabriel,” and my brother sang harmonies on everything and played drums on all the other songs, so it was really a collective effort from a lot of friends.

Lastly, Young Sim has invited me to list my album under his Feel Good Music Coalition label which I happily did.  I love that guy and take every opportunity to work with him that I can.

Continue reading “Interview – Arthur Hatton, founder of Linescratchers”

Interview – Arthur Hatton, founder of Linescratchers

Interview – Tristyn Elizabeth, a rising star in Austin

Deep in the heart of Texas is a town known for live music, cowboys, and the blues.  When I think of Austin, Texas, I really don’t think of pop music… until now.  Allow me to introduce you to Tristyn Elizabeth.  After a couple of years of paying her dues as a singer-songwriter at many of the open mic events in Austin, she has emerged from the studio with her first real studio effort, an EP entitled Kiss Me in the Rain.  Like a butterfly emerging from a cocoon, she has used her time in the studio to transform herself from a singer-songwriter into a more polished pop artist, without abandoning her roots.  I actually know Tristyn, after being in her ward for a couple of years in Georgia.  I recently connected with 21-year-old Tristyn to hear her story about her development as an artist.

 

How did you get started in music?

My dad is a songwriter/producer type as well and he’d always be writing or playing or talking music all the time. That was a huge influence all my life. I remember when Britney Spears and N’sync and Backstreet boys were  huge, I’d blast it in the living room and sing and dance to it with my siblings and imagine growing up to be a singer. I started writing sometime in high school. It started when I would listen to songs on the radio and it didn’t fit how I felt. There wasn’t a song I could sing from my soul I guess, I was in high school and I was dramatic. So I started writing music on my guitar.  All the songs I wrote were kinda bad and embarrassing. Over time they got better with re-writes and new life experiences. I wrote better ones when I went off to college. Also, when I was in high school  my dad would need vocals for various projects and songs and I’d record on those. That’s basically where it started. Continue reading “Interview – Tristyn Elizabeth, a rising star in Austin”

Interview – Tristyn Elizabeth, a rising star in Austin

An Interview With Myself – Matt Mylroie

Matt MylroieUpon hearing rumors that I had been working hard to wrap up an album project for December release, I decided to sit down with myself for an interview. Here are all the facts for our loyal Linescratchers readers.

 

Does your album project have a general theme?

To me, these are guitar-driven songs about life. They are real, they are raw, and they are relevant.  That’s pretty much the theme of the project.

Continue reading “An Interview With Myself – Matt Mylroie”

An Interview With Myself – Matt Mylroie