La Deshumanización del Arte

First off, let me apologize for the lack of posts, my 18 credit hours this semester have been keeping me busy.

From that school work however, I came across an interesting essay by a man named José Ortega y Gasset called La Deshumanización del Arte. Written in 1925, the essay explores art, what it was before his time and what it had become.  For Ortega, art is something lost to some and loved by others.  He wrote (translated):

“Wherefore, the new art divides the public in two classes of individuals: those who understand it and those who don’t understand it; those being, the artists and those who are not artists.  The new art is an artistic art.” (p 53)

Artistic art?  Isn’t that a little redundant?  Like a flavorful flavor or colorful color?   Continue reading “La Deshumanización del Arte”

La Deshumanización del Arte

Music Production and Sound Quality: Keys!

Hello again!  Continuing in my series highlighting some key points and tips in getting a great production, we continue this time with a quick look at keyboards.   I’m sure there are many of us who find a great patch on the keyboard, run the outputs directly into our DAW, and call it a day. But, with just a little more attention, you can take “stock”  synths and samples, add your own flavor to them, and then kick ’em up a notch! Continue reading “Music Production and Sound Quality: Keys!”

Music Production and Sound Quality: Keys!

Podcast – October 23rd, 2010

New special Mid-term Elections episode featuring the Insufferable Hipster!

Precious Lungs – The Black Mountainside
Don’t Drink the Water – Idiot Glee
Lioness – Mayan Fox
Special Election Report by the Insufferable Hipster
Northern Labour Party – Less Than Three
When I Should Be Sleeping – Colby Miller
Sadie! Sadie! Sadie! – Kittin

Special thanks to Thomas Hatton, voice actor

Podcast – October 23rd, 2010

David Archuleta releases third album

Archuleta fans can rejoice yet again. David Archuleta released his third album, entitled The Other Side of Down, on October 5th. Reviews so far have generally been positive. The album is available on iTunes HERE.

I’m completely willing to accept reviews of the album to be published here on Linescratchers.  If you enjoy the album, send me a review at linescratchers@gmail.com .  Enjoy.

David Archuleta releases third album

The Archivist, vol. v; Pilot’s Greatest Gigs

Wherein the Archivist writeth further concerning his time in the band Pilot. He confesseth to puerile rockstar behavior while expounding on the challenges of gigging in Provo during the century’s end. But with challenges come opportunities, and herein ye may see how one band, to wit: Pilot, rose to meet said challenges, despite opposition from the city constabulary and churlish disque jockeys.
Continue reading “The Archivist, vol. v; Pilot’s Greatest Gigs”

The Archivist, vol. v; Pilot’s Greatest Gigs

The Barefoot Movement

ALT-COUNTRY/FOLK

A few hours southeast of here, at East Tennessee State, a rootsy, acoustic folk duo was organized in 2009, with tight vocal harmonies and an engaging live show. That year, they organized an ambitious lineup of 40 live shows, and added one more member, completing their trio. That group is The Barefoot Movement, and I contacted the founding member, vocalist, fiddle player, fellow Southerner, and Latter-day Saint Noah Wall to be featured right here on Linescratchers.

Listeners who are familiar with Nickel Creek and Allison Krauss and Union Station might recognize a similar approach to acoustic folk music in The Barefoot Movement.  Musicians will also take note of three very talented instrumentalists, and the harmonies really have a way of catching the ear. In short, The Barefoot Movement provides musical satisfaction from almost every angle. In this interview, Noah speaks to us about growing up with an artistic family, staying spiritual on the road, and “settling down.” Continue reading “The Barefoot Movement”

The Barefoot Movement

Feel Good Music Coalition website now up

The great Young Sim, founder of the Feel Good Music Coalition promotions organization, has created a website for all musicians affiliated with his organization. I flatter myself to say that I’m on there too. At this website, you will find promotional flyers for upcoming shows (usually hip hop and usually in the Salt Lake area), information about Sim’s life and vision, news, music videos, and a store where you can purchase merchandise and good music. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, if anyone can change the future of music in Salt Lake, and amongst the youth of the Church (and elsewhere), it’s Young Sim.

You can check it out, and get more of Sim’s vision for the future of good music HERE.

Feel Good Music Coalition website now up

Chance Thomas scoring new Monopoly game

I got a quick note from Chance Thomas, the award-winning composer for video games such as Avatar and The Lord of the Rings. Electronic Arts is planning to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the board game Monopoly by releasing a 3-D city-building game called Monopoly Streets. Chance Thomas has confirmed that he will be writing the score. Seems exciting! You can find a link to a promotional release of the theme by clicking HERE.

Chance Thomas scoring new Monopoly game

Elliott Smith and the Community of Christ

My first exposure to Elliott Smith was on my mission, from an extremely music-savvy companion who just happened to have a copy of From a Basement on the Hill (I’ll refrain from relating his name, just in case our mission president is reading). I loved the album, but when I got home and read more about Elliott Smith, his story was just too painful for me to get into much of his other work, especially when combined with my inevitable post-mission blues.

Over the weekend, though, I caught a sentence on his Wikipedia page that piqued my interest, and I went on to read a section from his biography. In Elliott Smith and the Big Nothing by Benjamin Nugent, the author mentions that Elliott Smith spent a number of years in his early childhood in the RLDS church (now the Community of Christ). His mother, Bunny, married his stepfather, Charles Welch, in 1973, when Elliott (then Steven) was almost four years old, and the wedding was officiated by an elder of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. It is unclear how long he and his family attended that church, but by middle school he was instead attending a Methodist church. Quite a bit of the angst in Smith’s upbringing came from a troubled relationship with his stepfather Charles, and later in his life, Smith came to believe that Charles had sexually abused him at some point. Continue reading “Elliott Smith and the Community of Christ”

Elliott Smith and the Community of Christ